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AddRan College of Liberal Arts

Department of History

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Courses

Winter 2020 Intersession Courses 

Review of the evolution of the American nation from the discovery of the New World to the end of the Civil War era, with emphasis on major forces shaping its development. Readings, course requirements and course design vary with the individual instructor

This course focuses on the region’s development from the 1820s to the present.  Students will study the aftermath of independence, Latin America’s insertion into the global economy, the impact of modernization on society, and the region’s experimentation with various political models, including conservatism, liberalism, populism, neo-liberalism, and revolution.  Special emphasis will be placed on culture, with analysis of music, film, art, literature, and dance.  Students should expect to be active participants in class and to examine and debate materials with their colleagues.

Spring 2021 Courses

In this course, students will work with the Career Advisor for AddRan College of Liberal Arts, to learn to market themselves effectively to perspective employers. Students will learn to articulate the skills and abilities that they possess, the skills and abilities that employers look for. Upon completion of this course students will have a polished resume and cover letter, a working professional portfolio, and will have practiced their interview skills.

 

This course will explore the path of European history from the origins of civilization to 1348. Its principal elements include the early societies of Mesopotamia, Egypt and Israel, the political and cultural contribution of Greece and Rome, the rise of Christianity and Islam, the characteristics of the medieval world, and the Black Death.

 

This course will explore the history of Europe in the early modern period, bracketed by the Black Death and the French Revolution. Principal themes include the artistic achievements of the Renaissance, the expansion of education and literacy, the invention of the printing press, the religious conflicts of the Reformation, the growth of centralized nation-states, the dramatic discoveries of the Scientific Revolution, and the creation of a global framework for the European experience.

A survey of the history of Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, in which we see the development of the political, social and economic systems that characterize the modern world.  This is also a period that has been dubbed "the age of extremes," in which Western civilization achieved some of its most glorious and its most barbaric feats:  world wars and weapons of mass destruction, spectacular technological advances, history's greatest ideological conflicts, the collapse of empires, unprecedented social and economic progress, and a dramatically accelerated rate of change in all areas.  We will focus on the common heritage and themes that make it possible to speak of 'European' history, while at the same time developing an appreciation for regional and cultural variations.  The course will identify, explore, and define the developments of modern European history, question why they happened, and evaluate their impact

Review of the emergence of the American nation through the transitional crises of the past hundred years, with emphasis on the roots of movements persisting into the modern period. Readings, course requirements and course design vary with the individual instructor.

This course examines the history of African-descended people in the United States from the colonial era to the present. We will explore major themes such as slavery, abolition, freedom dreams, Black internationalism, Jim Crow segregation, state violence, and Black political visions.

This survey course is an introduction to the history, politics, culture and societies of the modern Middle East. The central issue is the major transformations of the last two centuries. We will focus on the domestic, regional and international forces that have shaped contemporary Middle Eastern realities. To understand how and why the Middle East changed from a relatively peaceful region into a radicalized environment, we will study particular Middle Eastern countries and the regional experience with European imperialism, authoritarian rule, the challenges of social and economic development, the rise of political Islam, the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil, and the role of the United States in the region.

 

This course focuses on the region’s development from the 1820s to the present. Students will study the aftermath of independence, Latin America’s insertion into the global economy, the impact of modernization on society, and the region’s experimentation with various political models, including conservatism, liberalism, populism, neo-liberalism, and revolution. Special emphasis will be placed on culture, with analysis of music, film, art, literature, and dance. Students should expect to be active participants in class and to prepare readings for every session. They will examine documents and debate materials with their colleagues, and they will take essay-based exams and complete several small papers.

This course is designed to instruct students in the research and writing skills specific to the discipline. Taught in a seminar format, the course is based on students' discussions and written and oral work.

In this course we will explore the history of Western Europe from the fourteenth through the eighteenth centuries (from the Black Death to the French Revolution).  Historians often refer to this time as the “early modern” period, during which Europe developed many of the characteristics we associate with modern civilization.  These centuries saw, among other things, the artistic glories of the Renaissance, the expansion of education and literacy, the invention of the printing press, the religious conflicts of the Reformation, the growth of centralized nation-states, the dramatic discoveries of the Scientific Revolution, and Europe’s gradual rise to supremacy on the world stage.  Our principal task over the course of the semester will be to explore and define these changes, question why they happened, and evaluate their impact.  Coursework includes primary source analysis, article summaries and comparisons, and essay exams.

 This course will look at how American military policy has found application in each of the nation's major wars, including the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, The Mexican War, The Civil War, The Spanish-American War, the two World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam. It will place combat operations within the context of national policy and strategy in an effort to say something about the causes, conduct, and consequences of the nation’s wars.

In the first millennium B.C., a settlement of Latin-speaking people established themselves on the plain of Latium.  They built one of the great civilizations of antiquity, as they conquered not only the Italian peninsula, but the Mediterranean world.   When the Roman people in Latium overthrew the early monarchies, they established the Roman Republic (rule by the senate), a form of government that served them well for almost five centuries.  How did the Romans build such a dynamic civilization?  As some historians have argued, it was about timing - they made the right decisions at the right time.  They were also practical.  Incorporating the ideas, culture and technology of conquered peoples into their own culture, they strengthened the Republic.  In return, they extended their expertise in administration, conquest, law and warfare by spreading  Roman culture and institutions into the territories of subject people.  They practiced an inclusiveness that extended Roman citizenship to many of the conquered.   We will also consider the challenges that the Roman state faced and the limitations of their power, as a series of civil wars tore the Republic apart, senatorial power declined, and Rome was transformed into one of the greatest empires in history.  When Augustus established his principate (rule by emperors), peace returned to the Roman world.  Although civil and foreign conflict erupted periodically, the Empire survived until 476 A.D., when the Visigoth Odoacer seized the imperial throne and the once powerful Roman Empire in the west was carved into a number of smaller Germanic kingdoms.   What caused the fracturing of the Roman Empire?  Was it the “barbarian invasion,” Christianity, social upheaval, or something else?  Finally, why did the Western Empire fall, while the Eastern Empire survived for another millennium?

 

Contact Dr. Szok for details.

Contact Dr. Szok for details.

 “Two world wars and one World Cup, we’ve won!” is the chant that can still be heard among England fans at their national team’s football matches. And certainly the violence of two total wars and the evolution of a culture of leisure and affluence have imprinted Britain’s twentieth century. But this course goes further to trace the evolution of Britain from sprawling empire to a European partner to a union in retreat; from Victorian prudery to the Swinging Sixties to the “Broken Britain” of the 21st century; and from a society preoccupied with class to one struggling with its multiracial character. Based upon a blend of lecture, discussion, and students’ written work, History 30543 will enrich students’ knowledge of how this island nation has affected world history, and how the world has helped to shape Britain as it is today.

Females make up slightly more than half of the population of the United States. But because their activities have usually taken place outside of the public sphere, women do not often appear in the standard historical record. This course will examine the history of women in America primarily as they have intersected with the public realm—employment, politics, reform, war—but it will also consider women at home in their roles as daughters, wives, and mothers. We'll read in depth about Puritans and freedom fighters.  The course includes three essay exams, reflections on primary sources, and a twelve-page research paper.

Survey and analysis of revolutionary movements in modern Latin America, with special emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Central America.

 

The growth of the Brazilian nation and civilization from colonial plantation beginnings through experiments with monarch and republic, to the rank of major country.

Contact Dr. Szok for details.

An exploration of the foundational period of American history with emphasis upon the evolution of Native American, European, and African peoples from first contacts through the Seven Years’ War.  We will examine settlement patterns, trade, religion, politics, the influence of the environment upon distinct regional developments, the impact of warfare, and the relationship of the colonies to the wider Atlantic World.
History 40813 explores the trans-Mississippi West's development and national and international significance since 1890.  Typical histories of the American West end in the 1890s thanks to the lingering emphasis of historian Frederick Jackson Turner’s interpretation that the frontier closed in 1890.  The region continued a distinctive trajectory throughout the 20th century and this course investigates major economic, political, social, and cultural themes related to region.  The course begins by considering the West as represented in popular culture and the American imagination, including rock music lyrics, art, and Hollywood films.  The intense and ongoing development of mythology associated with the region constitutes one of the course’s major themes.  The course also examines the region’s economic development related to WWI, the New Deal, WWII, the Cold War, tourism, and the high-tech industry.  That economic development contributed to demographic shifts that changed the region from functioning essentially as a domestic colony of the East to becoming an important factor in the United States.  The course also examines the significance of the Mormon presence, issues related to the shared border with Mexico, and the region’s role in linking the United States to the Pacific Rim.  The class format includes lectures and discussions.  The course fulfills requirements for Writing Emphasis and Historical Traditions or Humanities.

This course deals with the Vietnam War in the larger context of modern Vietnamese history, with an emphasis on the period since 1862.  It emphasizes such topics as the impact of colonial rule, the rise of Vietnamese nationalism and communism, and the French and American wars in Vietnam.  This period of Vietnamese history involves many of the ideas and forces that shaped the twentieth century: nationalism, colonialism, revolution, communism, capitalism, nation building, and the Cold War. 

This discussion-heavy course surveys the complex interactions between human beings and their environment in North America from pre-Columbian times to the recent past.  Topics will include Native American ecology, the Columbian exchange, changing conceptions of wilderness, influences of agriculture and industry, the development of conservation, the origins of the environmental movement, and consideration of the Anthropocene Epoch and climate.  Students will interpret a variety of textual and graphic primary sources including art.  The reading list was in flux at press time, but required readings will span a broad temporal and geographic spectrum.  Assignments will include a documentary video based on original primary source research and a take-home final exam.

Research seminar on the US experience in Panama during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Students will participate in semester-long readings on the history of Panama and the US presence, focusing on the Canal Zone, a 553 square mile territory controlled by the United States from 1903 to 1979.  The class will examine the dynamics of the US colony, including politics, economics, family life, race, gender, leisure activities, and the Zone’s relationship to the Panamanian republic.  For their research projects, students will pick a Canal Zone narrative, written by a US resident, and contextualize the book in its time period.