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AddRan College of Liberal Arts

Department of English

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Courses

Spring 2020 Courses

 

Dr. Adriane Bezusko
T/TH 14:00-15:20
Core: LT, HUM
English Majors: Lower-division elective
Writing Majors: Lower-division elective

This class introduces students to short and long fiction that explores the “feminization of poverty” in America. We will analyze how depictions of the poor have evolved over time and examine conflicting narratives about who is poor and why. In class discussions we will ask: Why and how is poverty gendered? Who gets to tell the story of economic inequality? How do narratives of poverty shape public perceptions of social welfare programs? What are the structural systems (eg. gender bias, racism)that perpetuate economic inequality? Students will be responsible for daily reading assignments and the course grade will be determined by engaged participation, weekly reading quizzes, 2exams, and a final project.

Dr. Adriane Bezusko
T/TH 15:30-16:50
Core: LT, HUM
English Majors: Lower-division elective
Writing Majors: Lower-division elective

This class introduces students to short and long fiction that explores the “feminization of poverty” in America. We will analyze how depictions of the poor have evolved over time and examine conflicting narratives about who is poor and why. In class discussions we will ask: Why and how is poverty gendered? Who gets to tell the story of economic inequality? How do narratives of poverty shape public perceptions of social welfare programs? What are the structural systems (e.g., gender bias, racism) that perpetuate economic inequality? Students will be responsible for daily reading assignments and the course grade will be determined by engaged participation, weekly reading quizzes, 2 exams, and a final project.

Dr. Jill C. Havens
MW 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Core: LT, HUM
English and Writing Majors: lower-division elective

Our brains are hardwired to tell stories, and for thousands of years, people have been telling ghost stories to entertain and frighten. Today, we are still obsessed by the ghost and love the chill we get when we hear a good tale. But why are humans so intrigued by stories of the dead who wonder the earth? Why have ghost stories been such a long-lasting and important part of our human experience? In this course we will explore the concept of the “ghost,” the history of “ghosts” in literature, and the literary significance and conventions of the “ghost story.” While we will do many things in this course, our main focus will be on the ghost story at the height of its popularity in Victorian and Edwardian England and America, from roughly 1820 to 1920. During this period, the Victorian ghost story became and remains still the classical example of what we now consider the “typical” ghost story.

As an introduction to fiction, this course will use the ghost story as a way to learn about some fundamental aspects of literature, like genre, character development, plot, setting, figurative use of language, narrative voice, and more. In this course, we will read stories by a variety of authors; learn about the conventions of the ghost story; explore the historical, social, and cultural contexts of these stories; and develop critical reading skills through close reading and a variety of interpretive approaches to the ghost story.

Dr. Linda K. Hughes
MW 2-3:30 p.m.
Core: LT

Poetry’s great themes include love, death, war, (re)birth, faith, freedom, quests, nature, and more. But do these themes mean the same things to all people in all places and times? We’ll explore the answer by reading poets from the past and present who have written English-language poetry starting from diverse class, gender, ethnic or racial, and geographic positions.

Professor Jennifer Griffith
MWF 11:00-11:50 a.m. or 12-12:50 a.m.
Core: LT
English and Writing Majors: lower-division elective

This class introduces students to works of British and American utopian and dystopian literature from the Renaissance to the 21st C.  Utopian literature and ideals serve as critiques of contemporary societies as well as provide visions for the future.  As such, they’re driven by hope—hope that humanity can be better, or in the case of dystopian fiction, that it can avoid a catastrophic future.  Throughout the centuries, the focus and source of this hope change as belief systems and technologies change.  Art—specifically literature—remains a space to imagine, expose, understand, and critique developments shaping human societies. For this course, students will read excerpts from John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Thomas More's foundational text Utopia.  They will also read the following novels/novellas: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr.  Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World as well as short stories by Octavia Butler, and miscellaneous poems.  Graded work includes reading quizzes, 3 exams, participation, and a group presentation.

Professor Timothy Ballingall
TR 12:30-1:50 p.m.
Core: HUM, LT
English majors: lower-division elective
Writing majors: lower-division elective

 Often disregarded as trivial, offering superficial solutions for deep-seated or systemic problems, or as emotionally indulgent true-love fluff, advice texts are experiencing a renaissance these days. Self-help is a $10 billion industry; Amazon divides “self-help” into 28 subcategories. Advice columns, far from being a relic of the heyday of newspapers, are a must-have for online publications like Slate, HuffPost, and New York Magazine. Where did these genres come from? Why have they persisted? And while the content and identities of these texts and writers, respectively, appear more diverse than ever, are the past iterations of these genres as one-dimensional as we think? To answer these questions, we will investigate historical and contemporary advice texts from a variety of perspectives, including, but not limited to, literary studies, cultural studies, gender studies, race and ethnic studies, and rhetorical studies.

Professor Sidney Thompson
TR 2:00-3:20
Core: WCO 1

One of the assigned texts for the class is Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: The Story of Success. The assignments will relate to international travel, or the importance of seeing the world differently by becoming more aware of our ingrained commonplaces. Travel, or broad exposure to diverse cultures, helps us become successful, or outliers.

Dr. Meghan Johnson
TR 2:00 –3:20 
CA or LT, HUM
English majors: lower-division elective
Writing majors: lower-division elective

 An exploration of the emergence and development of the American short story genre from romanticism and realism to naturalism and an emerging modernism. Students will be introduced to how writers shaped the short story into a powerful and evolving literary form that fostered advancements in mass communication, publication, and literacy in the United States. Students will particularly focus on how authors shared understandings of their natural and synthetic environments with audiences who were often exposed to a harsh, unfertile, ever-changing American Earth. While analyzing how definitions of “nature” and “environment” transform within the literary mass-marketplace, students will also examine how identifications of and with American environments are related to key literary historical movements and particular cultural and capitalistic antagonisms.

Professor Jennifer Griffith
TR 12:30-1:50 p.m. or 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Core: WCO2
English and Writing Majors: lower-division elective

As an Intermediate Composition course, this class will focus on reading, creating, and analyzing arguments, specifically those involving power and its connection with class, literacy, and poverty. We will engage texts and a film exploring diverse environments in which power, socio-economic status, and literacy intermingle and impact poverty and its alleviation. These investigations will be multi-disciplinary and will allow students to identify a problem of interest to them/their discipline and argue for a solution on behalf of those for whom it matters most.  In addition to this final research essay, students will complete daily writing and reading assignments, an argument analysis essay, and a research portfolio supporting their final essay. As a class, we will engage in an end-of-term service project.

Dr. Meghan Johnson
TR 12:30 –1:50
LT, HUM
English majors: lower-division elective
Writing majors: lower-division elective

This course surveys the major American writers who wrote about and for working-class American citizens from the Gilded Age through the Cold War. Class readings and lectures will pursue an answer to the question: How can we best conceptualize and represent class identity in the United States? Students will read and investigate how American citizens lived, labored, struggled, expressed, and witnessed the working-class experience, while also exploring how these experiences appear grossly disparate when considering race, gender, ethnicity, and region. Students will identify how a “traditionally under-represented” class of Americans has been both marginalized and praised for their mythic “bootstrap” narratives, “self-made” motivations, and American Dreams. Students will consider this literature alongside important socioeconomic and cultural events in labor history, capitalism, proletarian uprising, and unionization. Finally, we will consider how working-class literature has influenced current understandings of (and stigmas toward) upward mobility and wage work in the twenty-first century. 

Professor Rachel Daugherty
TR 11:00-12:20 p.m.
Core: HUM, GA
English Majors: Elective
Writing Majors: Rhetoric & Culture  

From a historical, theoretical, and meditative perspective, this course investigates the intersections between texts, technology, and how society uses both to communicate. We will discuss the development of various writing innovations—everything from cave drawings to television programming—and we will analyze the ways in which civilizations have influenced and evolved with and alongside writing technologies. From a creative perspective, you will construct rhetorically effective compositions that make use of various technologies. We will approach the design of every document with a contemplative awareness of how our writing implements (and software) shape the compositions we produce. Our readings will support these learning goals, so that when you finish this course you should be able to describe major theoretical concepts that connect writing and technology. Major readings include Alex Soojung-Kim Pang’s The Distraction Addictionand Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains. Our assignments include an oral history project, book review, and service learning project.

Dr. Gabrielle Kirilloff
TR 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Core: HUM
English and Writing Majors: Elective, Digitial Culture and Data Analytics (DCDA)

 In this class you will learn how to study literature using digital tools. We will explore questions such as: What types of literary texts have been preserved online? How can we rediscover forgotten authors? What happens when we use computers and statistics to study thousands of books instead of a few? Digital tools help us explore, represent, and analyze cultures and texts. As part of this survey, you will begin to critically examine how digital scholarship may be useful to your own academic interests and research pursuits. Though there are many ways to approach the digital humanities, this class will focus on three specific “areas” of digital scholarship: archives and editions, text analysis, and digital map making. This class focuses on building—you will not only learn about digital archives and interactive maps, you will learn how to make them. No previous experience in technology or programming is required! This class is designed to give you an insight into what is possible using digital methods.

Dr. Adriane Bezusko
T/TH 8:00-9:20
Core: WCO2
Prerequisite: ENGL 10803 or equivalent and sophomore standing
English Majors: Lower-division elective
Writing Majors: Lower-division elective

 Course Description:  As an intermediate composition course, this class will focus on reading, creating, and analyzing arguments, specifically those related to education and opportunity. We will engage texts, podcasts, and films that explore the historical, political, and social conditions that affect access to educational opportunities in America. These investigations will be interdisciplinary and will allow students to identify specific problems of interest to them and their discipline and argue for meaningful interventions. Students will complete daily writing and reading assignments, a rhetorical analysis essay, a definition essay and a proposal for solutions.

Dr. Adriane Bezusko
T/TH
Core: WCO2
Prerequisite: ENGL 10803 or equivalent and sophomore standing
English and Writing majors: lower-division elective

 As an intermediate composition course, this class will focus on reading, creating, and analyzing arguments, specifically those related to education and opportunity. We will engage texts, podcasts, and films that explore the historical, political, and social conditions that affect access to educational opportunities in America. These investigations will be interdisciplinary and will allow students to identify specific problems of interest to them and their discipline and argue for meaningful interventions. Students will complete daily writing and reading assignments, a rhetorical analysis essay, a definition essay and a proposal for solutions.

MWF 10:00-10:50
Core: LT, HUM
English and Writing majors: lower-division elective

 Langston Hughes once asked the provocative question, “What happens to a dream deferred?” Decades later, Audre Lorde states, “I know that [the American] dream was never mine.”  This course will center black writers like Langston Hughes and Audre Lorde to see how they grappled with, pursued, and rearticulated the American Dream in their work. We will move through major historical and literary moments in African American literature to analyze how black writers meditate on their proximity to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” We will read across genres to study this question. We will read speeches like Frederick Douglass’s “What To the Slave is the Fourth of July,” novels like Nella Larsen’s Quicksand, and dramas like Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun. We will also engage critical questions like: How have Black people reimagined the American Dream? What is the American Dream and who is it for?  

Professor Nicholas Brown
TR 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Core: CA, HUM
English majors: Writing
Writing majors: Design and Editing/Digitally Intensive

 “You walk into the dungeon. The air smells damp and you see a faint light at the end of a hallway in front of you. A light breeze blows across your neck, causing you to hesitate. What do you do?” Touted by the publisher as being the world’s premier roleplaying game, Dungeons and Dragons has retaken the public spotlight in recent years following the success of Netflix’s Stranger Things. The game’s clear success/failure dichotomies and preference for combat heroics betray its origins as a tabletop wargame; what happens when we play the game rhetorically in ways that the developers never intended?

 In this class, students will examine the tabletop roleplaying game phenomenon through the lens of Dungeons and Dragons in order to understand better the rhetorical dimensions of writing within the game. Students will consider the myriad ways writing functions in tabletop roleplaying games, including the ways developers and players write to play the game, the ways that players re-write the game and its narrative through their play, and the development of “homebrew” house rules that customize the gaming experience based on the party’s preferences.

 Students will play, write, and re-write collaborative adventures for the 5th edition Dungeons and Dragons roleplaying game system. These adventures will help students to understand the cultural importance of the tabletop roleplaying game, the relationships existing between design and testing, and the influence of fan communities on the development of games. Additionally, students will immerse themselves in activities such as painting miniature figurines and building terrain for use during gameplay in order to better understand the culture of tabletop roleplaying gamers.

Dr. Layne Craig
MWF 10-10:50 a.m. and 11-11:50 a.m.
Core: CA, HUM, WGST
English and Writing Majors: lower-division elective

In this class, students will look at examples in different media of the genres of utopia and dystopia, whose narratives so often revolve around issues of gender and sexuality. We will learn about the history of these two genres and the relationship between them, examine their characteristics and how different authors manipulate those, and look particularly at how gender, sexuality, reproduction, and related issues are treated in utopias and dystopias. We’ll read works from authors including Margaret Atwood, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Octavia Butler, and Kazuo Ishiguro; examples of visual media we’ll view include the films Children of Men and Gattaca. Students will also have opportunities to look at YA dystopias and contemporary television shows as part of a short independent research project. Grades will be based on reading quizzes, 3 short answer exams, and two written assignments, one of which will have a presentation component. 

Dr. Gabrielle Kirilloff
TR 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Core: HUM
English Majors: Elective, Digital Culture and Data Analytics (DCDA)
Writing Majors: DCDA

In this class you will learn how to study literature using digital tools. We will explore questions such as: What types of literary texts have been preserved online? How can we rediscover forgotten authors? What happens when we use computers and statistics to study thousands of books instead of a few? Digital tools help us explore, represent, and analyze cultures and texts. As part of this survey, you will begin to critically examine how digital scholarship may be useful to your own academic interests and research pursuits. Though there are many ways to approach the digital humanities, this class will focus on three specific “areas” of digital scholarship: archives and editions, text analysis, and digital map making. This class focuses on building—you will not only learn about digital archives and interactive maps, you will learn how to make them. No previous experience in technology or programming is required! This class is designed to give you an insight into what is possible using digital methods.

Professor Curt Rode
TR 11:00-12:20 p.m.
Core: WCO2

In this course, students will study a variety of new media in order to determine the ways in which writers employ different strategies when composing their multimodal texts. Students will then be required to produce new media texts of their own in multiple modes and genres (magazine article, web sites, and documentary or Public Service Announcement).

How does writing for a web page differ from writing a conventional essay? How does working with images affect our sense of audience? How does our sense of authorship change when we collaborate on a video? This course will consider the ways in which the expectations for “good writing” shift when we write in and for different digital environments.

While this is a writing class that satisfies the WCO core requirement, it is designed for students with a particular interest in computers and in writing for digital environments. A knowledge of and comfort with computers is a big plus.

Professor Neil Easterbrook       
TR 8-9.15am                                                      
Core: LT, HUM
English and Writing majors: lower-division elective

The recent popular success of fantasy has been remarkable. Book series (Harry Potter) and films (The Lord of the RingsStar Wars) have both amassed enormous grosses and collected critical acclaim. While a considerable amount of modern fantasy is targeted at children and adults of, and let’s be frank about this, indiscriminate tastes who are seeking mindless entertainment, the literary genre generally seeks thoughtful, shrewd audiences interested in philosophical and ethical reflection, intelligence and wit, as well as imaginative alternatives to current political and empirical conditions. Our course will survey some representative works of twentieth century fantasy—whether ideologically progressive or ideologically reactionary—for just those qualities.

We’ll divide the class into halves, one focused on fantasy for children and the other on fantasy for adults. Although we’ll screen two recent films (Dave McKean’s version of Neil Gaiman’s MirrorMask and Guillermo Del Toro's Pan’s Labyrinth), the course’s main focus will be fiction, and we’ll read six novels: The Hobbit (J.R.R. Tolkien), The Golden Compass (Phillip Pullman), A Wizard of Earthsea (Ursula K. Le Guin), The Scar (China Miéville), The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (Junot Díaz), and The Buried Giant (Kazuo Ishiguro)

Also required will be two open-book essays exams (questions provided in advance), eight reading quizzes (low score dropped), one 6-8 page paper (on a work of secondary scholarship—probably A Short History of Fantasy by Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn), regular class attendance, and informed participation in discussion.

Professor Annette E. Wren
TR 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Core: LT, HUM
English Majors: Elective
Writing Majors: n/a

 “Crime doesn’t pay” is an idiom that might apply to real-life misfeasance, but certainly does not apply to crime fiction. Since the first “modern” crime fiction story in 1819, this genre has continually expanded, evolved, and occupied the literary world. From penny dreadfuls such as Thomas Peckett’s Prest’s Sweeney Todd to Gillian Flynn’s Sharp Objects, the crime story allows readers to indulge in murder, mystery, and mayhem from the safety of a book’s pages. This course outlines the evolution of the crime genre from its inception in the nineteenth century to the twenty-first century and provides a sampling of crime’s most scandalous stories, eeriest mysteries, and greatest detective minds, this course explores the history of crime fiction. We’ll follow the penny dreadful and its evolution into the detective novel, the historical crime fiction narrative, and the crime thriller.

 Major readings for this course include Sweeney Todd, Agatha Christie’s Ordeal by Innocence, Walter Mosley’s Devil in a Blue Dress, and Louise Erdrich’s Round House. Shorter readings include stories from Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Pauline E. Hopkins. Assignments include daily reading quizzes, a mid-term, final exam, and creative project.

Dr. Bonnie Blackwell 
MW 2:00-3:20 pm 
Core categories (if any): WCO 2 

This writing seminar gives students the opportunity to improve their prose writing and argumentation skills while examining the long history of true crime.  We will practice proving guilt or innocence using different types of evidence and different forms of argument by looking at judicial and literary history.  We will draft and revise arguments in a variety of formats, including in-class essays, threaded discussions, and formal papers.  Students will complete a research format on a murder that occurred in their hometown.  Topics will include:  the history of Sensationalist literature; Jack the Ripper mythology; The Servant Girl Annihilator of Austin, TX; Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women of the US and Canada, Transgender murders in US and Brazil; the Golden State Killer; and hometown murders. 

Professor Alex Lemon
MWF 10:00-10:50 p.m. 
Core: WEM
English and Writing Majors: Writing 

Is there any real truth in creative nonfiction? What makes a piece of creative nonfiction worth reading? What is creative nonfiction, anyway? Through readings and weekly writing assignments, we will engage these and many other questions. The goal of this course is to help you grow as a writer of creative nonfictions. Students will spend one half of class time reading and analyzing creative nonfiction using contemporary and historical writing as our models (from Seneca to Maggie Nelson). We will spend the other half of our time with the new work of class members, energizing and supporting one another by workshopping. Requirements include weekly writing assignments, journaling, daily reading and peer critique, regular attendance and thoughtful participation.

Dr. Joseph Darda 
MW 3:30-4:50 p.m.
English Majors: American Lit, Global & Diasporic Lit, Legal Studies, Race and Ethnic Studies
Writing Majors: Lit & Language

“Why are they showing this to us?” Ta-Nehisi Coates asked every February when his teachers wheeled in a TV from the AV department and, in honor of Black History Month, showed him and his classmates footage of white policemen beating black people protesting the segregation of Southern schools, public transportation, and lunch counters. There had to be more to the civil rights movement, Coates suspected, than “films dedicated to the glories of being beaten on camera.”

Bayard Rustin, the black labor leader, thought the same thing in 1965, when he declared the end of the “classical stage” of the civil rights movement––stretching from the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954 to the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the movement Coates learned about in school––and looked ahead to the movement’s next stage. “At issue, after all, is not civil rights strictly speaking, but social and economic conditions,” he wrote. “The civil rights movement is evolving from a protest movement into a full-fledged social movement.”

This course is about the literature of that larger social movement, from the black popular front of the 1930s and 1940s, in which Rustin himself participated, to the women of color feminisms of the 1970s and 1980s. Through the writing of Carlos Bulosan, Anne Moody, Huey Newton, Rodolfo Gonzales, Frank Chin, and Audre Lorde, we will explore the long, multiple, transnational social movements that so often demanded more than civil rights. The civil rights movement is, as Coates discovered in high school, a story handed down to us that may foreground some people and struggles and set aside others. This course interrogates the movement stories we tell and reconsiders the stories we don’

Dr. Nathanael O'Reilly
TR 12:30-1:50 p.m.
Core: n/a
English Majors: British Lit
Writing Majors: Lit & Language

The Research Seminar in British Literature introduces English majors and minors to a sustained, long-format research project over the course of the semester. Students will discuss and examine the practical and professional aspects of the English major while attempting to synthesize and integrate their various learning experiences in British literature and writing. The seminar will focus on British women’s writing produced during the first half of the twentieth century, especially modernist works by Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Anna Wickham and Stevie Smith. We will study fiction, poetry and non-fiction prose, paying special attention to feminism, modernism, gender roles, sexuality and class. In-class activities will include discussion, oral presentations and writing and research workshops. Students will produce a long-form research project (12-15 pages) synthesizing research with analysis in order to create a sustained argument. Prerequisites: English majors or minors only; students must have junior or senior standing and must have completed one 30000-level ENGL/WRIT/CRWT course.

Dr. Mona Narain
TR 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Core: HUM
English and Writing Majors: British Lit, pre-1800
*Also counts for WGST minor and certificate

Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Maria Edgeworth and Jane Austen—some of these early modern women’s names are well known to us as writers while others not so much. The very notion of women writing for public consumption was considered scandalous before the early modern period in history. Male contemporaries called Aphra Behn a “punk” because she wrote plays that showed women in powerful positions making their own way in a patriarchal society. Eliza Haywood’s heroines created multiple personas to travel abroad or seduce lovers to bend gender rules. How can we forget Jane Austen’s heroine Eliza Bennet’s refusal to be part of the marriage market, shocking everyone as she turned down Mr. Collins’ proposal? Maria Edgeworth argued for female education and Lady Mary Montagu insisted that the English start inoculating their children, a practice she learnt in Turkey. These women writers were trailblazers.

In this course we will read a variety of texts in different genres by women writers of the long eighteenth century (1660-1830) to understand the “rise” of the woman writer and the literary history of women’s writing in this period. We will analyze how they created a space for themselves in the literary sphere, how they participated in contemporary debates about gender roles, the institution of marriage, the role of poetic inspiration, whether women should be educated and whether women should write at all for public consumption. Assignments for the course will include seminar style discussions, quizzes, student presentations and a longer final research project.

Prerequisites: Freshman and sophomore composition (or credit therefore) PLUS another English course, or permission of instructor.

Dr. Chantel L. Carlson
MWF 11:00-11:50 a.m.
Core: WEM
English Majors: Writing
Writing: Creative Writing

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

SAMUEL BECKETT

In this introductory dramatic writing workshop, students will be introduced to techniques in writing drama. Students will learn and apply the principles of writing dramatic monologues, scenes, and one-act plays, including character and plot development, stage directions, and writing dialogue. Film students are welcome in this course and will have the opportunity to work on writing for the screen as well. Prior to written assignments, students will learn critical terms (such as characterization, plot structure, setting, dialogue, staging, etc.) as well as become familiar with the possibilities of the modern stage through readings of “traditional” plays. Because this is a writing workshop, students will be able to take advantage of a collaborative environment by receiving constructive critiques on their own written work. In addition to quizzes, students will be required to write (and perform) several dramatic exercises/scenes, as well as complete a one-act play for their final project or write and film a short scene.

Dr. Chantel L. Carlson
M 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Core: n/a
English Majors: Writing
Writing Majors: Internship

This 1.5 credit-hour course is for students with an interest in literary magazine publication and basic web design. Students in the course will work in every stage of the production of the semester’s print issue of eleven40seven, TCU’s undergraduate journal of the arts, and its web edition (www.1147.tcu.edu). Specifically, students will gain knowledge of and experience in (1) the history and purpose of the student literary magazine, (2) the selection, editing, and proofing of the semester’s submissions, (3) the journal’s print layout and the design of the issue’s web edition, and (4) the distribution and promotion of the completed issue. Students will also receive, as needed, practical software training. The course may be repeated for credit.

Dr. Chantel L. Carlson
W 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Core: n/a
English Majors: Writing
Writing Majors: Internship

This 1.5 credit-hour course is for students with an interest in literary magazine publication and basic web design. Students in the course will work in every stage of the production of the semester’s anniversary issue of eleven40seven, TCU’s undergraduate journal of the arts, and its web edition (www.1147.tcu.edu). Specifically, students will gain knowledge of and experience in (1) the history and purpose of the student literary magazine, (2) the selection, editing, and proofing of the semester’s submissions, (3) the journal’s print layout and the design of the issue’s web edition, and (4) the distribution and promotion of the completed issue. Students will also receive, as needed, practical software training. The course may be repeated for credit.

Dr. Ariane Balizet
TR 11:00-12:20 p.m.
Core: HUM
English Majors: Pre-1800, British Lit
Writing Majors: (major category)

This class is an introduction to early British Literature from the Middle Ages through 1800. In this class, we will study the history of English literature from the warriors of the Anglo-Saxon period to the love sonneteers of the Renaissance. Readings will draw from poetry, prose, and drama, although particular emphasis will be placed on the theatrical tradition and its evolving meaning in early English literature and culture. This class will also trace literary forms and verse styles along with rhetorical conventions across the genres.  Requirements include regular reading and attendance, reading quizzes, two exams, and two analytical essays. 

Dr. Layne Craig
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.
Core: LT, HUM, WEM
English Majors: American Lit
Writing Majors: Lit & Language

This section of ENGL 30503 will introduce students to American literature of the 1920s. Often depicted as the age of flappers, fast cars, and moonshine, this time in American history has been romanticized perhaps more than any other; however, literary writers of this era inflected their descriptions of music, alcohol, and debauchery with representations of the serious social problems of their era, including poverty, crime, racism, and gender inequity. We’ll focus on the pairing of images of decadence and social commentary as we examine the canon of 1920s literature,  asking questions such as: How do the values of writers from the 1920s differ from those of previous generations? How do art, technology, and music affect the production of literature in the 1920s? How do artistic movements like the Harlem Renaissance and the expatriate community in Paris speak to the literary and social concerns of the 1920s? Authors we study may include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, and Edith Wharton. Assignments will include two exams, an archival research project, discussion board contributions, and longer research paper. 

Brandon Manning
MWF 11:00-11:50
Core: CA or LT, WEM
English majors: American, Global & Diasporic
Writing majors: Literature & Language

This course will survey African American literature from the peculiar institution of slavery to the present. We will move in chronological order as we think through themes, tropes, and aesthetic choices of writers during the Antebellum period, Harlem Renaissance, Jim Crow, Black Arts Movement, and this Post-Civil Rights contemporary moment. We will examine the role of race and racism as well as the vestiges of slavery as we situate literature as an imaginative process by which writers represent, respond, or create alternatives to living in a country that as W.E.B. Du Bois asserts situates blackness as a problem. We will look to seminal figures like Harriet Jacobs, Booker T. Washington, Zora Neale Hurston, Gloria Naylor, and contextualize these figures within their historical moment while thinking about literary and cultural reverberations of their work in the present. We will engage different genres and mediums as we seek the answer to questions such as: What is African American literature? To what extent is African American literature bound to social constructions of race and racism? How have representations of blackness evolved alongside (or outside) the country’s long (often glacial) march towards freedom and justice?

Dr. Rima Abunasser
Core: LT, HUM
English Majors: Global & Diasporic
Writing Majors: Lit & Language

This course will explore Arab & North African women’s literary traditions over the past century. Although most of the texts were written in Arabic, they come from countries with specific histories and cultures in which the legacies of British and French colonialism still hang heavy. Most of these writings might be characterized as feminist, yet many artists refuse “feminist” as an attribute to describe their work. Why? What does it mean for outsiders to attach their own meanings to actions and texts that their authors might reject? We will discuss the problems that arise when discussing Arab and North African women within a Western frame of reference. Class discussion will be grounded in critical race theory & cultural, constructivist approaches to literature, culture, and creativity. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of Arab and North African women’s self-representations; to learn how to read creative texts critically and to develop and refine analytical and research skills.

Dr. Bonnie Blackwell
W 6:00-9:40 pm 
English majors:  Theory
Writing majors:  Lit & Language

This theory course includes a film lab.  Franchises and Fan Cultures critically examines consumer-driven participatory culture through multiple media, including magazine and newspaper serial publication, film franchises, television series, parodies, pastiches and interactive fan cultures, fan fiction, and fan art.  Case studies may vary by semester. This section will investigate Sherlock Holmes.  We will practice drafting and revising arguments in a variety of formats, including essay exams, threaded discussions,  formal and formal papers.  Books will include Arthur Conan Doyle, The Complete Sherlock Holmes, and theoretical readings in pdf form.  Screenings will include The BBC series Sherlock (2010-2018), Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987), Murder Rooms, Guy Ritchie's Sherlock franchise films (2009-11) and the 20th Century Fox franchise films starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce (1939-1949).

Dr. Jill C. Havens
R 6:00-8:40 p.m.
Core: HUM, WEM
English Majors: British Lit, Early Lit
Writing Majors: Literature Elective

The name “Viking” evokes an image of a barbaric, illiterate pagan warrior with a horned helmet on his head and a battle ax in his hand ravaging, raping, and pillaging Northern Europe. “Oh Lord, save us from the fury of the Northmen!” was a prayer often on the lips of their victims. Or so the story goes. For centuries the reputation of the Vikings has suffered from this stereotype, a stereotype reinforced by their victims: civilized, literate Christians. But were the Vikings really like this?

In this course, we will explore the rich, sophisticated literature of the Vikings, from their ancient myths and complex eddic and skaldic poetry about the Norse gods and kings to the highly developed prose narratives of the Icelandic sagas (the precursor to the modern novel).

As great travelers and explorers, the Vikings encountered many different cultures, so we will also read accounts of the Northmen by others, most notably the Anglo-Saxons and the Arabs. And we will spend time studying the religion, language, social structure, and history of the Norse peoples to reflect on the impact the Vikings had on the development of the English language, the concept of democracy, and the shape of modern Europe.

Dr. Carmen Kynard
Core: CA, WEM
English Majors: Theory
Writing Majors: Rhetoric & Culture

Word is Bond: An Introduction to African American Rhetoric

This course is designed to explore the critical discourse practices of African American activist groups, communities, performers, artists, and general political leaders over the past 200 years. We will examine persuasive strategies in multiple African American public texts (song, speech, tweet, meme, painting, letter, essay, etc.) that have channeled and challenged the most pressing social issues of their time.

As a classroom community, we will identify prominent voices, past and present, who constitute the tradition of African American rhetoric (AAR) while also asking ourselves: how does AAR help us achieve more nuanced understandings of multiple Black experiences alongside alternative visions for racial-social justice? We will examine key themes in relation to the knowledges and communicative practices endemic to the freedom struggles of Black people in the Americas: educational activism, gender/sexuality/intersectional justice, the sacred-secular continuum, political economy, digital Blackness, and the history of Black Language.

Dr. Joddy Murray
MW 5:00 - 6:20 pm
Core: none
English Majors: elective
Writing Majors: Design & Editing, Digitally Intensive

In this course, you will explore the topic of sound as well as author multimedia texts intended for audio consumption. Products for this class will be audio texts intended to be flexible enough for several different audiences. You will produce a variety of products, including a podcast, that explores the different ways sound expresses and communicates meaning to a listening audience.

Dr. Sharon Anderson Harris
T/Th 9:30 am
Core: WEM
English majors: Theory
Writing majors: Rhetoric and Culture

The propagandist reduces complex problems to sound bits, Tweets, and bumper stickers, distorting other stakeholders’ positions through out-of-context quotations and misleading data, as Ramage, Bean, and Johnson argue. The only objective of propaganda is to win over an audience by any means, including outright lies, deliberate use of bogus evidence, and distorted assertions. Of course, acts of persuasion that call on verifiable evidence and careful reasoning are created every moment. But if you have ever marched in a rally, ever affixed a bumper sticker, ever used 140 characters to blast a position, you realize that carefully nuanced arguments seldom make the heart race and the blood rise. So you may very well ask: What is the difference between propaganda and persuasion? Can propaganda ever be considered moral? And why are we persuaded by misinformation, or “fake news”? What is a “troll farm,” anyway? Is war “peace”? Is freedom “slavery”? Is ignorance “strength”? These propositions from George Orwell’s 1984 come alive today as we consider the bumfuzzling array of online images, videos, and sound bites, some of which are moralistic, some acts of persuasion, some propaganda.

In this course we will examine documentary film, animated film, current digital communications, and twentieth-century fiction in the light of selected theories of persuasion and propaganda. Students will write several short analytical papers responding to the films and fiction through various theoretical lenses.

Professor Sidney Thompson
MW 3:30-4:50
Core: WEM
English majors: Writing
Writing majors: Creative Writing

This workshop is geared toward those who already have some experience writing realistic short stories, with the intentions of broadening students’ knowledge of the elements of craft so that writing publishable fiction is not simply the goal but the expectation. The chief texts for this course will be the stories written by workshop members, but throughout the semester students also will read and examine craft essays and contemporary American short fiction in order to better understand how to apply what they learn to their own writing. Previous creative writing workshop experience is a prerequisite for this class.

Professor Alex Lemon
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.
Core: WEM
English Majors: Writing
Writing Majors: Creative Writing

“Poetry is not only dream and vision; it is the skeleton architecture of our lives,” the poet Audre Lorde said. “It lays the foundations for a future of change, a bridge across our fears has never been before.” And in this advanced poetry writing class, we will immerse ourselves in the ramifications of Lorde’s words; we will explore poetry’s manifold tangles. Your poetry is the focus of this course, but to write well you must read well. To help develop your poetic craft and your eye for high quality work we will read and discuss a spectrum of literature, engaging both traditional and contemporary poetics in a variety of ways. Course materials will include collections by contemporary poets and an anthology of classical work. Requirements include weekly writing assignments, journaling, statements of poetics and analysis, one presentation and typed workshop responses. Our methods of poetic consumption will be ranging and, as the needs of the class dictate, fluid. Our approaches will be imbued with jubilance. Expect a challenging array of workshops, craft discussions, writing exercises and student-led craft talks.

Dr. Theresa Gaul
MW 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Core: CA or LT
English Majors: American Lit
Writing: Lit & Language

2018 marked the 150th publication anniversary of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, a book that influenced generations of girls and has been adapted by numerous writers and filmmakers, including in a new film adaptation that will be released in December 2019.    This course will focus on the popularity and meanings of this novel since its publication, as well as its position as part of a literary tradition of depicting US girls and their coming of age experiences that stretches back to the period of the American Revolution. In addition to reading Little Women and scholarship about it, comparing film adaptations, and reading samples of Alcott’s other writings, we will explore scholarship in the field of Girl Studies and read titles that may include Susannah Rowson’s The Coquette, Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig, Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, E.D.E.N. Southworth’s The Hidden Hand, Elizabeth Stoddard’s The Morgesons, and Zitkála-Šá’s and Sui Sin Far’s short stories.  Assignments may include leading discussions; group projects; papers analyzing Alcott’s influence, adaptations of her work, or her relationships to other writers; and a research project to recover the work of a nineteenth century woman writer who wrote about girls and coming of age.

 

Dr. Carrie Leverenz
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.
Core: WEM
English Majors: Writing
Writing Majors: Design & Editing

WRIT 40233, Writing for Publication, focuses on both key terms in the phrase “writing for publication.” In addition to writing multiple pieces in publishable magazine genres such as features, profiles, and commentaries, students will also explore the cultural work that publication does—Who writes and publishes? What kind of writing gets published? What purposes do magazines serve? How does digital publication affect magazine writing and its circulation?

Assignments:

Blog writing; Drafts and revisions of Feature, Profile, and Commentary; “Why’s This So Good” group presentation.

Reading:

John McPhee, Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

Best American Magazine Writing 2019

Additional reading as assigned.

Dr. Linda K. Hughes
MW 3:30-4:50 p.m.
Core: LT, CA, WGST, CRES
English Majors: Global & Diasporic
Writing Majors: Upper-division lit & language, elective

Women’s poetry is ancient, starting with Sappho in the ancient world, and also right now in both print and performance poetry. It is also richly diverse in expression, preoccupations, and inventiveness—a superb medium for expressing love but also social justice demands. Our transatlantic survey of women poets from 1570-2005 will take us to Jamaica and Canada as well as Britain and the US; feature Black, white, mixed-race, Native American (or First Nations), Latinx, and Asian-descended poets; range in class from a queen (Elizabeth I) to working class, middle-class, and enslaved women; and explore experiences of lesbian, heteronormative, and other sexualities of women. The course is thus based in intersectional approaches to women and gender, and will include the assigned reading of Kimberle Crenshaw’s landmark essay of 1991 in the Stanford Law Review, “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color,” to provide theoretical grounding. In addition to completing all the readings, twice commenting in class on a poet assigned that day, and writing two short papers (a substitute for a midterm) on a unit’s themes and the poems related to them, you will work with 1-2 classmates collaboratively on a semester project (10-12 pp.) devoted to a collection of print poems by a single late 20th or 21st century women poet, and take a final exam. This course carries LA, CA, WGST, Global & Diasporic Lit. credit, and has been submitted for approval as a CRES elective.

Professor Curt Rode
TR 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Core: WEM
English Majors: Writing
Writing Majors Design & Editing, Digitally Intensive

In this course, you will be both reading about and authoring multimedia texts, both with image and hypertext. Products for this class will not be the traditional, academic-oriented essays, but will instead be texts reliant on several media (this includes, but is not limited to, web authoring—though knowledge of html is not necessarily requirement for this course). We will work with many modes of texts and you will produce a variety of products that involve many different media, as well as explore some of the most recent theories regarding the challenges to authorship these types of products invoke. We will also be looking at and composing images with rhetoric in mind, culminating in a gallery of your work at the end of the semester.

While this is a writing class that satisfies the WEM core requirement, it is designed for students with a particular interest in writing, design, and working in digital environments. A knowledge of and comfort with computers is a big plus.

Dr. Neil Easterbrook     
TR 9:30-10:45am                                                       
Core: WEM
English Majors: Upper-division elective
Writing Majors: Lit & Language

This semester will be devoted to “literary fantasy”—modern works that, generically, are unequivocally works of fantasy but are also serious works that we might call “Literature” rather than merely popular entertainment.

Most long fantasy novels tend to be what’s called “epic” or “high” fantasy, such as that written by JRR Tolkien or George RR Martin. But in the spring we’ll read three long novels: one has the structure of a faerie tale, a second might best be called magic realism or farce, and the third is perhaps best called just weird. All are built with careful character development, serious engagements with serious themes, and exquisitely crafted prose. In chronological order: John Crowley’s Little, Big (1981), Mark Helprin’s Winter’s Tale (1983), and China Miéville’s The Scar (2002). There will also be some supplemental reading about the individual books, the nature of fantasy, and genre theory.

Ann George
Day/time TBA
English majors: Writing
Writing majors: Internship

Students with 60 credit hours and a Writing/English GPA of 3.0 or CUM GPA of 2.8 can receive workplace experience (and, depending on agency policy, sometimes a stipend) from companies or agencies in publishing, advertising, grant writing, web writing, or other fields. Duties are arranged to fit each student’s schedule, and work opportunities may include research gathering, editing, social media/web authoring, or document production. Students will produce a writing portfolio at the end of term. Students need to work a minimum of 8 hours a week during the semester to receive three hours of credit. This course may be repeated once for credit.

NOTE: Students should plan to meet with the internship coordinator the semester before the one in which they’ll be enrolled in the course. Students are responsible for setting up their own internships. Some internships are competitive, and some require applications 6 weeks-6 months in advance. Each agency may have only 2 interns per semester. Internships for fall semester must be confirmed by the first Monday in August and internships for spring by the end of fall finals week.

Interested students should read through internship procedures and agency contacts on the English department website. Further information available from the Internship Coordinator, Dr. Ann George (322 Reed)