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Sustainability and Social Justice

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Spring 2019 Events

“Ohero:Kon – Under the Husk” film screening

This is a 26-minute documentary made by a Mohawk filmmaker. It follows “the journey of two Mohawk girls as they take part in their traditional passage rites to becoming Mohawk Women. Kaienkwinehtha and Kasennakohe are childhood friends from traditional families living in the Mohawk Community of Akwesasne that straddles the U.S. / Canada border. They both take part in a four-year adolescent passage rites ceremony called Oheró:kon (“Under the Husk”) that has been revived in their community. This ceremony challenges them spiritually, mentally, emotionally, and physically. It shapes the women they become.

Thursday, February 7, 2019
5:30-7:00 p.m.
Sid Richardson, Lecture Hall 1
Contact: s.langston@tcu.edu

Learn more about this event here.

 

Human Trafficking Lecture with Kevin Bales, Ph.D.

In his book, “Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy” , Dr. Kevin Bales exposed how modern slavery penetrates the global economy and flows into the things we buy. In 2001 he founded the NGO Free the Slaves which has liberated thousands of slaves worldwide. Dr. Bales is Professor of Contemporary Slavery at the University of Nottingham.

Thursday, February 7, 2019
6:30-8:00 p.m.
Dee J. Kelly Alumni and Visitors Center

Learn more about this event here.

 

Screening of “Human Flow” documentary

Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change, and war in the greatest human displacement since World War II. ‘Human Flow,’ an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, gives a powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact.

Captured over the course of an eventful year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent human stories that stretches across the globe in countries including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Greece, Germany, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, and Turkey.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019
6:30-9:00 p.m.
Sid Richardson, Lecture Hall 4

Learn more about this event here.

 

Screening of “Return to the Andes” documentary

After living in NYC for 20 years, Nelida Silva (from Soy Andina) returns to her Peruvian birthplace ​to help rural women start businesses–and ends up running for mayor.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019
6:30 p.m.
Sid Richardson, Lecture Hall 4
Contact: j.singleton@tcu.edu

Learn more about this event here.

 

“Students Flourishing in the Digital Age” by John Dunne, Ph.D.

Dr. John Dunne is Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities at the Center for Healthy Minds, University of Wisconsin-Madison. For this presentation he will focus on the Student Flourishing Initiative, a course that incorporates contemplative and other sorts of practices to help students adjust to and thrive in college. The course is being jointly developed by scholars at the Universities of Wisconsin, Virginia, and Penn State.

Tuesday, March 26, 2019
5:00- 6:30 p.m.
TBD

Learn more about this event here.

 

“Disability Art and Representing Marginalized Communities” by Ms. Rita Lehrer

Riva Lehrer is an artist, writer, and curator whose work focuses on issues of physical identity and the socially challenged body. She is best known for representations of people with impairments, and those whose sexuality or gender identity have long been stigmatized. Her work has been seen in venues including the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian; the United Nations; the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC; the Arnot Museum; the DeCordova Museum; the Frye Museum; the Chicago Cultural Center; and the State of Illinois Museum. She has been a visiting artist and lecturer across the US and Europe.

Monday, April 8, 2019
2:00- 3:30 p.m.
TBD

Learn more about this event here.

 

“We are Birds: A California Indian Story” film screening and discussion

Bird Songs have been a part of Cahuilla and other Southern California Native cultures for thousands of years, and the migrations of these songs as they have been shared over time have created a long history of cultural connectedness among tribes across the region. These songs have also become a linkage between generations, and are at the heart of a growing movement to sustain Native language and cultural practice. _We Are Birds_ is a documentary film project that focuses on this movement as experienced by a variety of Elders, Bird Singers and Dancers, and other Cultural Preservationists.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019
5:00- 6:30 p.m.
Sid Richardson, Lecture Hall 1

Learn more about this event here.