Courses

ENGLISH MAJOR/MINOR SUBCATEGORIES

The English minor allows lower-division courses to count for American Literature, British Literature, and Writing. The English major allows only upper-division courses to count as American Literature, British Literature, Writing, and Theory.

ENGL 20423 Intro to Medieval Literature
ENGL 20433 Intro to Shakespeare
ENGL 20603 Western World Literature I
ENGL 20633 Mythology
ENGL 20913 Literature & Civilizations I
ENGL 30113 British Literature to 1800
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
ENGL 30413 Studies in Medieval Literature & Culture
ENGL 30423 Early British Drama
ENGL 30433 Renaissance Poetry
ENGL 30583 Early American Literature
ENGL 30623 Medieval Literature in Translation
ENGL 30633 Medieval and Early Modern Women Writers
ENGL 30673 King Arthur in Literature and Legend
ENGL 40323 History of the Language
ENGL 40403 Chaucer
ENGL 40413 Renaissance In England
ENGL 40423 Restoration and 18th Century Literature, 1660-1790
ENGL 40453 British Novel to 1832
ENGL 40473 Milton and his Contemporaries
ENGL 40483 Shakespeare and Marlowe
ENGL 40493 Shakespeare
ENGL 40513 U.S. Women’s Writing I
ENGL 40543 Studies in Early American Literature
ENGL 40633 Love, Sex, and Power in Renaissance England
ENGL 40653 Renaissance Literature and the New Science

ENGL 38013 Research Seminar in British Literature
ENGL 38023 Research Seminar in American Literature
ENGL 38033 Research Seminar in Global and Diasporic Literature

ENGL 20503 Major American Writers
ENGL 20523 Sports in Modern American Literature
ENGL 20533 The American Dream
ENGL 20543 The American Short Story
ENGL 20553  Intro to American Studies
ENGL 20573  Intro to Native American Literatures
ENGL 20583 The Western
ENGL 30133 American Literature to 1865
ENGL 30143 American Literature since 1865
ENGL 30163 Urban Experiences and American Literature
ENGL 30183 Prison Literature
ENGL 30503 The Roaring Twenties
ENGL 30513 American Poetry
ENGL 30523 Popular Literature
ENGL 30533 Modern American-Jewish Literature
ENGL 30553 19th Century American Novel
ENGL 30563 American Drama
ENGL 30573 Travail and Triumph: A Survey of African-American Literature
ENGL 30583 Early American Literature
ENGL 30593 American Fiction, 1960 to the Present
ENGL 30693 U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literature
ENGL 30703 Contemporary Latino Literature
ENGL 30713 Mexican-American Literature & Culture
ENGL 40513 U.S. Women’s Writing I
ENGL 40523 Emerson and Thoreau
ENGL 40533 Toni Morrison
ENGL 40543 Studies in Early American Literature
ENGL 40553 Studies in 19th-Century American Literature
ENGL 40563 U.S. Women’s Writing II
ENGL 40573 Mark Twain
ENGL 40583 Contemporary American Poetry
ENGL 40593 Faulkner
ENGL 40683 Studies in 20th-Century American Literature
ENGL 40723 Young Adult Literature in American Culture

ENGL 20403 Major British Writers
ENGL 20433 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 30113 British Literature to 1800
ENGL 30123 British Literature since 1800
ENGL 30413 Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture
ENGL 30423 Early British Drama
ENGL 30433 Renaissance Poetry
ENGL 30443 20th-Century Irish Literature
ENGL 30453 The Victorian Novel
ENGL 30463 British Literature: The Bloomsbury Group
ENGL 30473 Wilde Years: Oscar Wilde and the 1890s
ENGL 30633 Medieval and Early Modern Women Writers
ENGL 30653 Jane Austen: Novels and Films
ENGL 30673 King Arthur in Literature and Legend
ENGL 30683 Post-Colonial Anglophone Literature
ENGL 30773 India: Texts and Traditions
ENGL 30783 Modern India: Literature and Culture
ENGL 30793 Multi-Ethnic Literature of the World (EXCEPT Fall 2015, when the course counts for Global & Diasporic Literature only)
ENGL 40403 Chaucer
ENGL 40413 Renaissance in England
ENGL 40423 Restoration and 18th-Century Literature, 1660-1790
ENGL 40433 19th-Century Literature
ENGL 40443 20th-Century Literature
ENGL 40453 British Novel to 1832
ENGL 40463 British Novel since 1832
ENGL 40473 Milton and His Contemporaries
ENGL 40483 Shakespeare and Marlowe
ENGL 40493 Shakespeare
ENGL 40613 King Arthur in Modern Literature and Culture
ENGL 40633 Love, Sex and Power in Renaissance England
ENGL 40643 British Romanticism
ENGL 40653 Renaissance Literature and the ‘New’ Science
ENGL 40663 Modern Fiction
ENGL 40693 20th-Century British and Irish Poetry

ENGL 30493 Women Poets and Poetic Tradition
ENGL 30533 Modern American-Jewish Literature
ENGL 30573 Travail and Triumph: A Survey of African-American Literature
ENGL 30623 Medieval Literature in Translation
ENGL 30683 Post-Colonial Anglophone Literature
ENGL 30693 U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literature
ENGL 30703 Contemporary Latino Literature
ENGL 30713 Mexican-American Culture
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling: Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art and Film
ENGL 30763 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Authors & Themes in Lit
ENGL 30773 India: Texts and Traditions
ENGL 30783 Modern India: Literature & Culture
ENGL 30793 Multi-Ethnic Literature of the World
ENGL 30843 Australian Literature
ENGL 30853 Asian-American Literature
ENGL 30863 Literature of the Middle East and North Africa
ENGL 40533 Toni Morrison
ENGL 40693 20th Century British and Irish Poetry
ENGL 40723 Young Adult Literature in American Culture
ENGL 50253 Classical Rhetoric

CRWT 10203 Introduction to Creative Writing (minor only)
CRWT 20103 Reading as a Writer   (minor only)
CRWT 20133 Performing Identity  (minor only)
WRIT 20303 Writing Games
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology and Society
WRIT 30213 Advanced Composition: Writing Genres
WRIT 30223 Technical Writing and Information Design
CRWT 30233 Creative Nonfiction Workshop I
WRIT 30263 Style
WRIT 30273 Argument and Persuasion
CRWT 30343 Fiction Writing Workshop I
CRWT 30353 Poetry Writing Workshop I
CRWT 30363 Digital Creative Writing
CRWT 30373 Drama Writing Workshop I
CRWT 40133 Creative Nonfiction Workshop II
WRIT 40163 Multimedia Authoring: Image and Hypertext
CRWT 40203 Fiction Writing Workshop II
CRWT 40213 Poetry Writing Workshop II
CRWT 40223 Drama Writing Workshop II
WRIT 40233 Writing for Publication
WRIT 40243 Professional Writing
WRIT 40263 Multimedia Authoring: Animation & Film
WRIT 40273 Writing Internship
WRIT 40283 Editing & Publishing
WRIT 40363 Multimedia Authoring: Mobile Apps & eBooks
ENGL 50233 Studies in Creative Writing

ENGL 30103 Introduction to Literary Theory
ENGL 30173 Marxist Cultural Theory
WRIT 30203 Urban Rhetorics
WRIT 30243 Rhetorical Practices in Culture
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
WRIT 30273 Argument and Persuasion
WRIT 30283 Cyberliteracy
WRIT 30663 Women’s Rhetorics
ENGL/WRIT 30803 Theories of Cinema
ENGL 30833 Serials, Franchises and Fan Cultures
ENGL 40123 Literary Criticism
WRIT 40253 Propaganda Analysis and Persuasion
ENGL 40323 History of the Language
WRIT 40333 Language, Rhetoric and Culture
ENGL 50243 Teaching Writing
ENGL 50253 Classical Rhetoric

ENGL 10103 Introduction to Fiction
ENGL 10113 Introduction to Poetry
ENGL 10123 Introduction to Drama
ENGL 10133 Introduction to Literature
ENGL 10303 Approaches to Film
ENGL 10503 Introduction to Nonfiction Genres
ENGL 20203 Girls’ Studies
ENGL 20213 Global Women’s Literature
ENGL 20223 Gender, Culture and Representation
ENGL 20233 Sex and Gender in Literature
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology and Society
ENGL 20423 Introduction to Medieval Literature
ENGL 20563 Intro to Latina/o Lit
ENGL 20593  Intro to Lit of the Global African Diaspora
ENGL 20603 Western World Literature I
ENGL 20613 Western World Literature II
ENGL 20623 Introduction to Women’s Writing
ENGL 20633 Mythology
ENGL 20643 Fable and Fantasy
ENGL 20653 The Romantic Imagination
ENGL 20663 Why Read Literature?
ENGL 20703 Intro to Law and Literature
ENGL 20713  Literature and Medicine
ENGL 20733 Science Fiction
ENGL 20743 Detective Novel
ENGL 20913 Literature and Civilizations I
ENGL 20923 Literature and Civilizations II
ENGL 20933 Non-Western World Lit
ENGL 30153 Nature Writing in Nature
WRIT 30391 Publication Production
ENGL 30613 Women’s Lives: Memoir and Fiction
ENGL 30723 Short Story
ENGL 30733 Satire
ENGL 30753 Literature and Film
ENGL/WRIT 30813 Books and the History of Print Culture
ENGL 30970 Directed Study in English
ENGL 30823 Law and Literature
ENGL 40673 Modern Drama
ENGL 40733 Children’s Literature
ENGL 40743 The Long Novel

 

WRITING MAJOR/MINOR SUBCATEGORIES

 

CRWT 10203 Introduction to Creative Writing
CRWT 20103 Reading as a Writer
CRWT 20133 Performing Identity
CRWT 30233 Creative Nonfiction Workshop I
CRWT 30343 Fiction Writing Workshop I
CRWT 30353 Poetry Writing Workshop I
CRWT 30363 Digital Creative Writing
CRWT 30373 Drama Writing Workshop I
CRWT 40133 Creative Writing Workshop II
CRWT 40203 Fiction Writing Workshop II
CRWT 40213 Poetry Writing Workshop II
CRWT 40223 Drama Writing Workshop II
ENGL 50233 Studies in Creative Writing

WRIT 20313 Power & Protest
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology and Society
WRIT 30203 Urban Rhetorics
WRIT 30213 Advanced Composition: Writing Genres
WRIT 30243 Rhetorical Practices in Culture
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
WRIT 30263 Style (prior to Fall 2015, counts for “Design & Editing”, during and after Fall 2015, counts as “Rhetoric & Culture”)
WRIT 30273 Argument and Persuasion
WRIT 30283 Cyberliteracy
WRIT 30293 Non-Human Rhetoric & Representation
WRIT 30663 Women’s Rhetorics
ENGL/WRIT 30803 Theories of Cinema
WRIT 40253 Propaganda Analysis and Persuasion
WRIT 40333 Language, Rhetoric and Culture
ENGL 50243 Teaching Writing
ENGL 50253 Classical Rhetoric

WRIT 20303 Writing Games
WRIT 30223 Technical Writing and Information Design
(prior to Fall 2015, counts as “Design & Editing”, during and after Fall 2015, counts as “Rhetoric & Culture”)
ENGL/ WRIT 30813 Books and the History of Print Culture
WRIT 40163 Multimedia Authoring: Image & Hypertext
WRIT 40233 Writing for Publication
WRIT 40243 Professional Writing
WRIT 40263 Multimedia Authoring: Animation & Film
WRIT 40283 Editing and Publication
WRIT 40363 Multimedia Authoring: Mobile Apps and eBooks

WRIT 30391 Publication Production  (taken for 3 credits)
WRIT 40273 Writing Internship

WRIT 20303 Writing Games
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology, and Society
WRIT 30203 Urban Rhetorics
WRIT 30223 Technical Writing and Information Design
WRIT 30283 Cyberliteracies
ENGL/WRIT 30363 Digital Creative Writing
WRIT 30391 Publication Production
WRIT 40163 Multimedia Authoring: Image & Hypertext
WRIT 40233 Writing for Publication
WRIT 40243 Professional Writing
WRIT 40263 Multimedia Authoring: Animation & Film
WRIT 40283 Editing and Publishing
WRIT 40363 Multimedia Authoring: Mobile Apps and eBooks

Any upper-division (3000 or 4000-level) ENGL course not specifically listed in another subcategory for the Writing major.

38063 Writing Major Seminar (required of all writing majors declared after 8/18/14)

OPTIONAL CONCENTRATIONS FOR ENGLISH AND WRITING MAJORS

Do you have an interest within the English or Writing major that you would like to pursue in greater depth?   Or a skill that you’d like to explore?  Students may elect to group their coursework for their major into a concentration by taking 9 hours of coursework from one of the following lists.   Students who elect to pursue a concentration fulfill all of the requirements for the major, but the concentration allows them to group their required courses and electives in exciting ways.

 

Students may choose from the concentrations already established and/or, with permission of their advisor and the English department Director of Undergraduate Studies, design their own concentration by taking 9 hours of ENGL and/or WRIT courses in a single topic or field of study.    After students complete their concentration, they register with the English department and the concentration appears on their transcript.

 

Each student may choose at most two concentrations.   All concentrations are available with the BA in either English or Writing.  Independent studies and thesis coursework may not be applied toward the concentration.  Students should talk to their advisor for more information.

The American Studies concentration exposes students to American literature and thought as a means of examining and identifying new ways of thinking about the evolution of American society from pre-colonial times to the present. Students in this concentration critically examine the mythologies and canons of American literature and culture, turning their attention to issues such as American expansion and exceptionalism, racial diversity and tension in the United States, America at war and peace, and the roles of particular regional, gendered, and ethnic groups in creating the American literary landscape. An American Studies concentration equips students with a range of transferable skills, including critical thinking, comparative analysis, global literacy, and communication skills. These skills prepare students to competitively pursue careers in education, law, politics, social work, business, counseling, and more.

Choose 3 courses  from among the following courses:

ENGL 20523 Sports in Modern American Literature
ENGL 20533 The American Dream
ENGL 20543 The American Short Story
ENGL 20553 Intro to American Studies
ENGL 20573 Intro to Native American Literatures
ENGL 20583 The Western
ENGL 30133 American Literature to 1865
ENGL 30143 American Literature since 1865
ENGL 30163 Urban Experiences and American Literature
ENGL 30183 Prison Literature
ENGL 30503 The Roaring Twenties
ENGL 30513 American Poetry
ENGL 30523 Popular Literature
ENGL 30533 Modern American-Jewish Literature
ENGL 30553 19th Century American Novel
ENGL 30563 American Drama
ENGL 30573: African-American Literature
ENGL 30583 Early American Literature
ENGL 30593 American Fiction, 1960 to the Present
ENGL 30693 U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literature
ENGL 30703 Contemporary Latino Literature
ENGL 30713 Mexican American Culture
ENGL 30853  Asian American Literature
ENGL 38023 Research Seminar in American Literature
ENGL 40513 U.S. Women’s Writing I
ENGL 40523 Emerson and Thoreau
ENGL 40533 Toni Morrison
ENGL 40543 Studies in Early American Literature
ENGL 40553 Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
ENGL 40563 U.S. Women’s Writing II
ENGL 40573 Mark Twain
ENGL 40583 Contemporary American Poetry
ENGL 40593 Faulkner
ENGL 40683 Studies in 20th Century American Literature
ENGL 40723 Young Adult Literature in American Culture

British Studies courses allow students to explore diverse roots of language and literary traditions. Great Britain historically includes Welsh, Scottish and Irish literary traditions. The British Empire intersected with world cultures and led to today’s dynamic multi-cultural British society.  Shakespeare’s Othello, Aphra Behn’s Oronooko, and postcolonial responses to British rule by Salman Rushdie or Zadie Smith all explore racial and cultural difference. Whether reading Chaucer’s “The Wife of Bath’s Tale,” Jane Austen’s critique of the marriage market, or about monsters from Frankenstein to Dorian Gray, students will learn to read, analyze, and write; to think historically; and to contextualize their ideas in multiple cultural backgrounds.  In short, they will learn many skills transferable to all of their future endeavors in our information-saturated multicultural society. . . while reading some of the world’s most phenomenal texts.

Choose three courses from among the British subcategory:

ENGL 20403 Major British Writers
ENGL 20423 Introduction to Medieval Literature
ENGL 20433 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 20633 Mythology
ENGL 20653 The Romantic Imagination
ENGL 30113 British Literature to 1800
ENGL 30123 British Literature since 1800
ENGL 30413 Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture
ENGL 30423 Early British Drama
ENGL 30433 Renaissance Poetry
ENGL 30443 Twentieth Century Irish Literature
ENGL 30453 The Victorian Novel
ENGL 30463 British Literature: The Bloomsbury Group
ENGL 30473 Wilde Years: Oscar Wilde and the 1890s
ENGL 30623 Medieval Literature in Translation
ENGL 30633 Medieval and Early Modern Women Writers
ENGL 30653 Jane Austen: Novels and Films
ENGL 30673 King Arthur in Literature and Legend
ENGL 30683 Post-Colonial Anglophone Literature
ENGL 30773  India:  Texts and Traditions
ENGL 30783 Modern India:  Literature and Culture
ENGL 38013 Research Seminar in British Literature
ENGL 40403 Chaucer
ENGL 40413 Renaissance in England
ENGL 40433 Studies in 19th-century British Literature
ENGL 40443 British lit since 1900
ENGL 40453 British Novel to 1832
ENGL 40463 British Novel since 1832
ENGL 40473 Milton and his Contemporaries
ENGL 40483 Shakespeare and Marlowe
ENGL 40493 Shakespeare
ENGL 40613 King Arthur in Modern Literature and Culture
ENGL 40633 Love, Sex, and Power in Renaissance England
ENGL 40643 British Romanticism
ENGL 40653 Renaissance Literature and the ‘New’ Science
ENGL 40663 Modern Fiction
ENGL 40693 20th Century British and Irish Poetry

The Creative Writing concentration is an opportunity for majors who desire sustained coursework in creative writing, including introductory and intermediate coursework, but do not wish to enroll in the Creative Writing minor. Students in the Creative Writing concentration take classes with our distinguished faculty, who help them discover their goals and shape their sense of themselves as writers. TCU undergraduate creative writers have gone on to pursue important careers as poets, novelists, journalists, and editors. However, these classes also give students opportunities to develop skills in communication and creative problem solving, which transition easily into a wide range of careers.

Note:   Writing majors with a Creative Writing minor may not also complete the Creative Writing concentration within their major courses.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL/ WRIT 10203 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGL/ WRIT 20103 Reading as a Writer
ENGL/ WRIT 20123 Travel Writing
ENGL/ WRIT 20133 Performing Identity
ENGL/ WRIT 30813 Books and the History of Print Culture
ENGL/ WRIT 30233 Creative Nonfiction Workshop I
ENGL/ WRIT 40133 Creative Nonfiction Workshop II
ENGL/ WRIT 30343 Fiction Writing Workshop I
ENGL/ WRIT 40203 Fiction Writing Workshop II
ENGL/ WRIT 30353 Poetry Writing Workshop I
ENGL/ WRIT 40213 Poetry Writing Workshop II
ENGL/ WRIT 30363 Digital Creative Writing
ENGL/ WRIT 30373 Drama Writing Workshop I
ENGL/ WRIT 40223 Drama Writing Workshop II
ENGL 30153 Nature Writing in Nature
ENGL/ WRT 50233 Studies in Creative Writing

Critical Theory studies how we construct our world—how language, history, and society shape our assumptions and actions.   Critical Theory students study how to analyze and interpret texts, speeches, and stances.   Work in Critical Theory prepares students for careers in law, politics, journalism, and research, or for graduate study in the liberal arts, but more broadly teaches students to be informed and inquisitive citizens.

Choose three courses from the theory subcategory

ENGL 20223 Gender, Culture and Representation
ENGL 20233 Sex and Gender in Literature
ENGL 30103 Introduction to Literary Theory
ENGL 30173 Marxist Cultural Theory
ENGL 40123 Literary Criticism
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology, and Society
WRIT 30243 Rhetorical Practices in Culture
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
WRIT 30663 Women’s Rhetorics
WRIT 30803 Theories of Cinema
WRIT 40333 Language, Rhetoric and Culture

The Digital Media concentration explores language in the 21st century through evolving technologies like video, podcasts, social media, web, and more. These technologies open new forms of communication in our increasingly global world and impact all facets of our lives, from entertainment to politics. While not a Communications degree, the Digital Media concentration provides a competitive edge for students interested in media industries, such as publishing, social media management, and marketing.

Choose from among the following courses:

WRIT 20303 Writing Games
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology, and Society
WRIT 30213 Advanced Composition: Writing Genres
WRIT 30283 Cyberliteracy
ENGL/ WRIT 30363 Digital Creative Writing
WRIT 30391 Publication Production
WRIT 30603 Rhetoric of Social Media
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling: Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art and Film
ENGL/ WRIT 30813 Books and the History of Print Culture
WRIT 30893  Digital Inclusiveness
WRIT 40163 Multimedia Authoring: Image and Hypertext
WRIT 40253 Propaganda Analysis and Persuasion
WRIT 40263 Multimedia Authoring: Animation and Film
WRIT 40363 Multimedia Authoring: Mobile Apps and eBooks

The Early Literature and Culture concentration explores ancient through early modern European, American, and Non-Western Literature.  Early literature allows students to explore the origins of today’s societies, while also providing a window to people, ideas and worldviews temporally (and sometimes geographically) distant from our own.   Students might study the development of Viking Sagas, debate the social contexts of love in Renaissance England, or track the origins of a new American culture.  Students study the traditions and innovations in genres and ideas.   Concentrating in Early Literature and Culture teaches students to read carefully, to apply critical frameworks, and to analyze historical contexts.   You’ll develop critical thinking, communication, and research skills useful in any field, or for graduate study in the liberal arts and positions in research, teaching, libraries, archives, and museums.

Choose three courses from the “Early Literature and Culture” category of the English major:

ENGL 20423 Introduction to Medieval Literature
ENGL 20433 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 20603 Western World Literature I
ENGL 20633 Mythology
ENGL 20643 Fable and Fantasy
ENGL 20913 Literature and Civilizations I
ENGL 30113 British Literature to 1800
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
ENGL 30413 Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture
ENGL 30423 Early British Drama
ENGL 30433 Renaissance Poetry
ENGL 30583: Early American Literature
ENGL 30623: Medieval Literature in Translation
ENGL 30633: Medieval and Early Modern Women Writers
ENGL 30673: King Arthur in Literature and Legend

ENGL 40323 History of the Language

ENGL 40403 Chaucer

ENGL 40413 Renaissance in England

ENGL 40423 Restoration and 18th Century Literature, 1660-1790

ENGL 40453 British Novel to 1832
ENGL 40473 Milton and his Contemporaries
ENGL 40483 Shakespeare and Marlowe
ENGL 40493 Shakespeare
ENGL 40513 U.S. Women’s Writing I
ENGL 40543 Studies in Early American Literature
ENGL 40633 Love, Sex, and Power in Renaissance England
ENGL 40653 Renaissance Literature and the ‘New’ Science
ENGL 50253 Classical Rhetoric

The Fiction Studies concentration intends to expose students to the genre of fiction over a range of social and historical contexts while also providing opportunities for active learning through creative writing coursework. Fiction Studies is an avenue of accessing our cultural imaginations as we attempt to understand ourselves and each other. Students study multiple genres of literature, and apply what they learn to their own writing. The Fiction Studies concentration is an asset to students who are interested in pursuing careers in publishing, or any career that requires critical thinking, effective communication, and creative problem solving.   Students with an interest in fiction may also pursue in graduate-level training in the liberal arts or fine arts.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL 10103 Introduction to Fiction
ENGL 20543 The American Short Story
ENGL 20583 The Western
ENGL 20633 Mythology
ENGL 20643 Fable and Fantasy
ENGL 20733 Science Fiction
ENGL 20743 Detective Fiction
ENGL 30343 Fiction Writing Workshop I
ENGL 30453 The Victorian Novel
ENGL 30463 British Literature: The Bloomsbury Group
ENGL 30613 Women’s Lives: Memoir and Fiction
ENGL 30723 Short Story
ENGL 30733 Satire
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling: Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art and Film
ENGL 40203 Fiction Writing Workshop IIENGL 40453 British Novel to 1832
ENGL 40463 British Novel since 1832
ENGL 40663 Modern Fiction
ENGL 40743  The Long Novel
ENGL/ WRIT 50233 Studies in Creative Writing

As Andy Warhol once said, “It’s the movies that have really been running things in America ever since they were invented. They show you what to do, how to do it, when to do it, how to feel about it, and how to look how you feel about it” (America).  Film has the ability to shape perceptions and culture. Students in the Film and Visual Culture concentration learn theoretical frameworks for analyzing film as a visual, auditory, and motion-based storytelling medium. A Film and Visual Culture concentration prepares students for graduate-level study in film, the liberal arts, or fine arts. Additionally, coursework in Film and Visual Culture equips students with analytical skills such as the ability to conduct independent research, express clear critical arguments, and understand an array of social, political, cultural, and historical perspectives. These abilities readily transfer into any position that requires independent problem-solving, confidence, and familiarity with media.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL  10303 Approaches to Film
ENGL/ WRIT 30373 Drama Writing Workshop I
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling:  Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art & Film
ENGL 30653 Jane Austen:  Novels and Films
ENGL 30753 Literature & Film
ENGL 30803 Theories of Cinema
ENGL 30833 Serials Franchises & Fan Culture
ENGL/ WRIT 40223 Drama Writing Workshop II
WRIT 40263 Multi-media Authoring:   Film and Animation

The concentration in Global and Diasporic Literature recognizes the scope, quality, and value of literature from the many cultures of the world. Classes include literature from India, Australia, the Middle East, and North Africa and explores various religions, ideologies, and cultural beliefs across geographical boundaries and time periods. Global Literature recognizes the scope of responses that we have to global issues as citizens of the world and encourages students to understand the world from perspectives outside their own. Global Literature expands our imaginations and capacities for empathy, exposing us to patterns of thought that are different from our own, which expands our senses of what’s permissible and why. The study of Global Literature equips students with a range of transferable skills, including critical thinking, comparative analysis, global literacy, and communication skills. These skills prepare students to competitively pursue careers in education, law, politics, social work, business, counseling, and more.

Choose three courses from among the following courses:

(note:  All courses from the English major’s  Global and Diasporic Literature subcategory are included in this concentration)

ENGL 20213 Global Women’s Literature
ENGL 20913 Literature and Civilizations I
ENGL 20923 Literature and Civilizations II
ENGL 20933 Non-Western World Literature
ENGL 30493 Women Poets and Poetic Tradition
ENGL 30533 Modern American-Jewish Literature
ENGL 30573 Travail and Triumph: A Survey of African-American Literature
ENGL 30623 Medieval Literature in Translation
ENGL 30683 Post-Colonial Anglophone Literature
ENGL 30693 U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literature
ENGL 30703 Contemporary Latino Literature
ENGL 30713 Mexican-American Culture
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling: Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art and Film
ENGL 30763 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Authors & Themes in Lit
ENGL 30773 India: Texts and Traditions
ENGL 30783 Modern India: Literature & Culture
ENGL 30793 Multi-Ethnic Literature of the World
ENGL 30843 Australian Literature
ENGL 30853 Asian-American Literature
ENGL 30863 Literature of the Middle East and North Africa
ENGL 38033 Research Seminar in Global Literature
ENGL 40533 Toni Morrison
ENGL 40693 20th Century British and Irish Poetry
ENGL 40723 Young Adult Literature in American Culture
ENGL 50253 Classical Rhetoric

Majors in English and Writing enhance students’ preparation for law school and jurisprudential fields.  All English and Writing classes teach students to read and analyze complex texts, to reason carefully, and to understand the social contexts of our norms and utterances.   The Legal Studies concentration, however, highlights classes that explicitly consider the relationship of language, literature, and justice, or the legal contexts of texts.  Legal Studies coursework prepares students for careers in several arenas, including law, politics, non-profit or social work, and research, and for graduate study in the liberal arts.

Choose from among the following courses:

WRIT 20303 Power and Protest
ENGL 20703 Intro to Law and Literature
ENGL 30103 Intro to Literary Theory
ENGL 30173 Marxist Cultural Theory
ENGL 30183 Prison Literature
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
WRIT 30271 Argument & Persuasion
ENGL 30573 African-American Literature
ENGL 30653 Jane Austen:  Novels and Films
ENGL 30693 U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literature
ENGL 30763 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Authors and Themes in Literature
ENGL 30823 Law and Literature
ENGL 40123 Literary Criticism
WRIT 40253 Propaganda Analysis and Persuasion
WRIT 40333 Language, Rhetoric and Culture

The Nonfiction Prose concentration offers students the opportunity to read and write multiple genres of nonfiction, from memoir or essay to journalistic prose.   In literature classes, students read exemplary work from the origins of nonfiction to the present.   And professional writing, creative writing, and rhetoric classes offer ample opportunity for students to polish their own prose.   Studying nonfiction can help students prepare for any career that requires clear or creative communication, whether in business, publishing, or nonprofit work.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL 10503 Intro to Nonfiction Genres
ENGL/WRIT  30233  Creative Nonfiction Workshop I
ENGL 30613 Women’s Lives:  Memoir and Fiction
ENGL/WRIT 40133 Creative Nonfiction Workshop II
WRIT 40233 Writing for Publication
ENGL 30583 Early American Literature

The Poetry and Poetics concentration allows students explore poetry both critically and creatively.   The Poetry and Poetics classes bring together a diverse array of literature and scholarship from different regions and historical periods., and allow students to progress in their own writing of poetry.  . The study of Poetry and Poetics fosters analytical and creative thinking skills that challenge memory and associative thinking. As such, a background in poetry is an asset to students who are interested in pursuing careers that require critical thinking, effective communication, and creative problem solving, or in graduate-level training in the liberal or fine arts.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL 10113 Introduction to Poetry
ENGL/ WRIT 10203 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGL/ WRIT 20103 Reading as a Writer
ENGL/WRIT 20133 Performance & Identity
ENGL 20653 The Romantic Imagination
ENGL 20663 Why Read Literature?
ENGL/ WRIT 30353 Poetry Writing Workshop I
ENGL/WRIT 30363 Digital Creative Writing
ENGL 30113  British Lit to 1800
ENGL 30433 Renaissance Poetry
ENGL 30493 Women Poets and Poetic Tradition
ENGL 30513 American Poetry
ENGL/ WRIT 40213 Poetry Writing Workshop II
ENGL 40403 Chaucer
ENGL 40473 Milton and his Contemporaries
ENGL 40483 Shakespeare and Marlowe
ENGL 40493 Shakespeare
ENGL 40583 Contemporary American Poetry
ENGL 40643 British Romanticism
ENGL 40693 20th Century British and Irish Poetry

The Publication and Communications concentration aims to provide students with the background knowledge and skills required to participate in the writing, editing, and publishing of multiple genres and media. English or Writing majors who concentrate in Publication and Communications develop skills such as  audience analysis, adaptation, collaborative writing dynamics, style, and document design. Such coursework helps students prepare for careers in publishing, marketing, editing, non-profit or grant writing, or any business communication.   Students who intend to pursue graduate study in Rhetoric and Composition, Communications, or Information Science may also find that this coursework gives them a competitive advantage.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL/ WRIT 10203 Introduction to Creative Writing
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology, and Society
WRIT 30213 Advanced Composition: Writing Genres
WRIT 30223 Technical Writing and Information Design
WRIT 30263 Style
WRIT 30283 Cyberliteracy
WRIT 30391 Publication Production
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling: Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art and Film
ENGL/ WRIT 30813 Books and the History of Print Culture
ENGL 30833 Serials, Franchises, and Fan Culture
WRIT 40163 Multimedia Authoring: Image and Hypertext
WRIT 40233 Writing for Publication
WRIT 40243 Professional Writing
WRIT 40253 Propaganda Analysis and Persuasion
WRIT 40273 Writing Internship
WRIT 40283 Editing and Publishing
WRIT 40333 Language, Rhetoric and Culture
WRIT 40363 Multimedia Authoring: Mobile Apps and eBooks

Students in the Racial and Ethnic studies concentration explore the lives, cultures, and histories of diverse racial and ethnic groups through the lenses of literature and rhetoric. Coursework applies critical frameworks to the study of race and ethnicity within and outside the borders of the United States, examining key issues such as diaspora, migration, social movements, and the political and economic power constructs of inequality and race. Students in this concentration acquire a range of transferable skills, including critical thinking, comparative analysis, civic literacy, and communication skills. A concentration in Racial and Ethnic studies prepares students to competitively pursue careers in education, law, politics, social work, business, counseling, and more.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL 20533 The American Dream
ENGL 20563 Intro to Latina/o Lit
ENGL 20573 Intro to Native American Literatures
ENGL 20593 Intro to Literatures of the Global African Diaspora
ENGL 20933 Non-Western World Literature
ENGL 30163 Urban Experiences and American Literature
ENGL 30183 Prison Literature
ENGL 30533 Modern American-Jewish Literature
ENGL 30573 African-American Literature Survey
ENGL 30683 Post-Colonial Anglophone Literature
ENGL 30693 U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literature
ENGL 30703 Contemporary Latino Literature
ENGL 30713 Mexican American Culture
ENGL 30743 Illustrated Storytelling;  Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Art & Film
ENGL 30773 India: Texts and Traditions
ENGL 30783 Modern India: Literature and Culture
ENGL 30793: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the World
ENGL 30183:  Prison Literature
ENGL 30833: Research Seminar in Global Literature
ENGL 30843 Australian Literature
ENGL 30853 Asian American Literature
ENGL 30863 Literature of Middle East and North Africa
ENGL 40533 Toni Morrison
WRIT 30203 Urban Rhetorics
ENGL 55533 Literature of the Latina/o Diaspora

The Rhetoric & Culture concentration focuses on the understanding and analysis of cultural expression and symbolic interaction across a broad range of forms and media. Courses in the Rhetoric and Culture concentration consider language’s symbolic, aesthetic, and affective form through various modes of theory and criticism. Students in the Rhetoric and Culture concentration hone their analytical and interpretive skills while expanding their sensitivity to, and understanding of, the dynamics of language in social interaction. While not a major in Journalism or Communications, many students who study Rhetoric and Culture go on to publishing, marketing, or creative jobs that use a variety of media, as well as work in such areas as politics, law, government, publishing, and public relations.

Choose from among the following courses:

WRIT 20313 Power and Protest
WRIT 20333 Language, Technology, and Society
WRIT 30203 Urban RhetoricsWRIT 30213 Advanced Composition:  Writing Genres
WRIT 30243 Rhetorical Practices in Culture
WRIT 30253 Rhetorical Traditions
WRIT 30263 Style
WRIT 30273 Argument and Persuasion
WRIT 30283 Cyberliteracy
WRIT 30293 Non-human Rhetoric
WRIT 30603 Rhetoric of Social Media
WRIT 30663 Women’s Rhetorics
ENGL/WRIT 30803 Theories of Cinema
WRIT 30893 Digital Inclusiveness
WRIT 40253 Propaganda Analysis and Persuasion
WRIT 40333 Language, Rhetoric and Culture
ENGL 50253 Classical Rhetoric

Students in this concentration investigate narratives and scholarship connected to the field of gender studies across a variety of social, cultural, and historical contexts. Courses help students think critically about the intersectionality of gender and issues including sexuality, work and social class, socially constructed inequalities, and global feminisms. Students in this concentration acquire a range of transferable skills, including critical thinking, comparative analysis, civic literacy, and communication skills. Gender Studies coursework prepares students for careers in areas including education, nonprofit work, business and management, law, and politics.

Choose from among the following courses:

ENGL 20203 Girls’ Studies
ENGL 20213 Global Women’s Literature
ENGL 20223 Gender, Culture and Representation
ENGL 20233 Sex and Gender in Literature
ENGL 20623 Intro to Women’s Writing
ENGL 30163 Urban Experiences in American Literature
ENGL 30453 The Victorian Novel
ENGL 30463 British Literature: The Bloomsbury Group
ENGL 30473 Wilde Years: Oscar Wilde and the 1890s
ENGL 30493 Women Poets and Poetic Tradition
ENGL 30613 Women’s Lives: Memoir and Fiction
ENGL 30633 Medieval and Early Modern Women Writers
ENGL 30653 Jane Austen:  Novels and Films
ENGL 30763 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Authors and Themes in Literature
ENGL 40513 U.S. Women’s Writing I
ENGL 40563 U.S. Women’s Writing II
ENGL 40633 Love, Sex, and Power in Renaissance England
ENGL 40723 Young Adult Literature in American Culture
ENGL 40533 Toni Morrison
WRIT 30663 Women’s Rhetorics

Do you have a different way you’d like to group your English or Writing courses?   Design your own concentration!   With the help of your advisor, select three courses that share a theme or skill.   After you have registered for the third class, email your advisor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies to request permission to register your concentration, listing a title for the concentration and the three classes you are using.    When the Director of Undergraduate Studies grants you permission for the concentration, forward that email to the department administration staff (see above instructions) to apply for your concentration.   That email may also count as your form for the concentration when you have completed the three courses and are ready to register the concentration.

HOW TO REGISTER YOUR CONCENTRATION

 To declare your intention to pursue a concentration, email the English department administrators Merry Roberts (m.roberts@tcu.edu) and Regina Lewis (r.lewis@ tcu.edu).   They will set up a file for you on the English department’s box drive and send you the link to that file.   After you have finished and received grades for all three classes in your concentration, use the link to post confirmation of your concentration to the box drive. Post:

1)  The form for your concentration, checking the boxes for the three classes you have completed.
2)  A pdf of your degree progress report.   Be sure the degree progress report shows the grades you received for the relevant three courses.

The English department will then notify the Registrar that you have completed the concentration and it will appear on your TCU transcript.

Note:   the concentration will not appear on your degree progress report, so please use the concentration registration forms to keep track of your progress towards completing the concentration.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

View our Course Descriptions.